Star of Canton Banquet

Have you been invited to a Chinese-style wedding banquet before? While some restaurants don’t typically serve vegetarian cuisine, they would sometimes make an exception. In February, I was invited to Veronica and Wilson’s wedding (I know both of them pretty well) at Star of Canton and here’s what I had:

cold dish

cold dish

 

 

 

The first dish is usually an assortment of vegetarian meats including salad on the side which in this case is green Japanese seaweed that you usually find in sushi served here in the middle.

Curious to find out what other dishes are being served? Click to find out more.

snow peas, lotus and lily bulb

This is a typical Cantonese dish that includes lotus root, snow peas, carrot, mushroom, green pepper and lily bulb.

If you can read Chinese, restaurants usually have fancy names for their dishes, especially during celebratory occasions such as during Chinese New Year or weddings so that diners will receive good luck and prosperity. For example, this dish is called 如意百年好和 meaning the couple will live in harmony for many years to come.

Deep fried crabstick

Deep fried crabstick

 

If you like deep fried food, this is one dish you’ll swoon over. Made of vegetarian crab meat, the drumstick is coated with a layer of breadcrumbs which is crunchy on the outside and meaty on the inside. I’m not a big fan of creamy salad so didn’t get an extra helping.

Celery prawn

Another ‘seafood dish’, mock prawn stir fried with celery and gluten. As you can see with Cantonese dishes, it’s always about variety but less on the spice or sauce (flavouring)

 

Shark's fin soup

Shark's fin soup

 

 

Most people would frown upon shark’s fin soup being served at wedding banquets but don’t worry as no sharks were harmed here. Add a teaspoon of vinegar when sipping the soup to give it a stab of flavour.

Abalone mushroom dao miu

Abalone mushroom dao miu

 

 

Abalone is one of those ‘expensive’ dishes you can’t miss at a wedding and Dou Miu/ Miao also known as Pea Shoots is a type of leafy vegetables that are usually served at restaurants. And shroom lovers will not want to miss these juicy shitake mushrooms.

Taro fish

Taro fish

 

 

Vegetarian fish has evolved over the times. Traditional restaurants usually serve taro in fish shape as shown here and some would argue they are more ‘natural’ than the modern fish usually made of soy protein, which might taste just as ‘fishy’ as the real ones sans bones.

Deep fried chicken

Deep fried chicken

The photo says it all. This chicken dish comes in 2 textures, I personally prefer the crunchy balls but both are good and nobody touched the ‘head’ out of respect.

If you’re invited to a wedding banquet make sure you remember 2 things, expect a feast so go with an empty stomach and bring a laisee (red packet and slot $$$) for the wedding couple. Yum Seng!

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